Recent craftings, Brown Kirtle finished

Following Drachenwald’s Crown Tourney I left some items unpacked for mending. A wool petticoat skirt got new hooks and eyes for closure so I won’t have to ask for help each time, a pair of hose got mended, a shirt was fixed up and the extraneous stiffening in the front opening of my new brown kirtle (which premiered at Crown) was removed.

The “new” brown kirtle, started in 2010 was finally finished in March 2017. When I tried it on, it was a little short, so I had to extend it by about 10 cm. I simply stitched on a long strip of the same fabric, and covered the seam with some black satin tape. It makes for a practically invisible extension, as it coordinates with more of the black satin tape which decorates the bodice. I also padded the new extended hem lightly, which helps the skirt drape a little better and keep out, even though it is entirely unlined.
Anyway, it is laced with inside lacing strips, and the front only has to lay closed with the help of hooks and eyes. For some reason I had decided to put in stiffening on this outside edge, which did nothing at all to keep the shape, instead being very much in the way for closing the hooks and eyes. So, once worn I decided to rip those out. Not too much of a procedure, and hopefully the dress will perform better in the future. I see it being a staple of my new Double Wars Camping wardrobe.
I took a few photos with my phone, but they are mysteriously deleted. I’ve not yet seen anyone post a picture of me wearing the brown kirtle at Crown, so I think evidence must wait until Double Wars, which is closer than is comfortable.

This past week, however, I’ve been working on a little napkin. I found some offcuts of the very fine hemp which I hemmed with drawn thread hem stitch, and embroidered with my filament silks. It’s a gift which has not yet been delivered, so I will wait to post pictures of that as well.

In other news, I finally closed down my livejournal, imported all the entries over to dreamwidth and my crafting history can now be found there instead: http://liadethornegge.dreamwidth.org

Week 3 Crafty update

So, this past week I’ve not been quite so diligent on my projects, as I was severly distracted by getting a new Bullet Journal.

Anyway, I did start and finish one of four napkins designated for the giftbasket His Majesty William of Drachenwald will bring to Estrella. The first one is a Pelican napkin and I’ve started on the second one, which will be a Chivalry token. I have two more prepared for a Laurel and Order of Defence. I shouldn’t have too much trouble finishing them in time.

Pelican done! #estrellawar #giftbasket #sca #pelican

A post shared by Lia de Thornegge (@lia.me.fecit) on

 

In other news, we finally made a decision and I bought fabric to sew up a tentlining for the sleeping apse in our new big tent. We’re going to use the extant tab top curtains as the front, and cover the rest of the bed area with light cotton canvas which was on sale at our local fabric store.

Intarsia galore

Last fall and this spring I took part in a major project to re-create two intarsia coverlets that are displayed in the Historiska Museum in Stockholm. It was a project started by Maria Neijman and Amica Sundström. There was a grand opening and unveiling of the two resulting textiles at the museum, where you can go from the extant originals to our copies and see how they might have appeared when new. I made one square on the Dalhem cover (the one in the foreground – photo by Jonas Evertsson). You can see them on display there until July.

Maria and Amica have written a summary of the project on their blog: Historical Textiles

Added photo

I updated the page for scrolls with the latest one I finished that was given out.

I took a commission for October Crown Tourney, a Lindquistringe (Drachenwald service award) and because I like it went with my favourite original MS Digby 36 at the Bodleian for the style.

However, I looked a little more closely at the original after I had inked the borders and realized that I have done some personalizations with the style, adding much more curves, and changing the ratio of different leaf shapes in the borders. I’m using the same colours, and so on, but there is definitely a change from the original. I don’t mind it, as I like the way it turns out, but I might try something in the future closer to the source. Unless, as the last couple of things I’ve taken on are showing, I will go with entirely different styles of scrolls for a bit.

I’m currently working on a pair of scrolls in landscape orientation, more document-style than illuminated page.

Anyway, check out the updated scrolls page!

Also, at Crown Tourney, where this Lindquistringe scroll was handed out, their Majesties also called me up to receive the Lindquistringe! I was entirely surprised and so honoured. A new scroll (by Mistress Bridget – squee!) to frame for me. Hurray.

New page!

Hurrah, I finally did the write-up of the sampler I did to test threads and some raised embroidery stitches. I didn’t really document which stitch I used where, but I think I only did one or two variations of the detached buttonhole, plus a couple of other stitches and outlines. Anyway, head on over to check it out!

Three and a half summer projects

While I’ve been in the frozen north, I’ve worked on three commission jobs, and one personal sewing projects. All of these projects will be coming along for delivery at Cudgel War which starts one week from now.

The first one is a partlet, which is accompanying a smock, which I have been working on for a long time. I finished the smock fairly quickly, but the partlet took a little longer, entirely because I didn’t actually pick it up to do anything on it, and also because I opted for a more work-heavy way to assemble it.

The second is a machine sewing project, commissioned to create a wardrobe for Pennsic. I’ve been using the machine and made three pretty much identical tunics, inspired by the Herjolfsnes-kirtle. One in bleached linen, two in unbleached. I did finish the necklines on them by hand, because… uh. Because. But all other seams and felling was done by machine, in a very efficient manner.

The third commission project is a red wool flat cap. At Double Wars I had brought the red hat I knitted, because it’s been on my shelf forever now and I’ve never been comfortable using it as it was too big for me. I had asked before the event if anyone was interested in buying it off me, for a seriously reduced price, and one lady was particularly quick to take me up on the offer. She only arrived to Double Wars late in the week however, and before she was there to try on the hat, someone else approached me asking if I could make them a red hat. I said  that of course I could, and I even had one red hat finished with me which was for sale. If the lady would end up not wanting it after trying it on I had a taker as the gentleman tried on the knitted hat and was much pleased with it. In the end the first lady snatched up the hat, and was (jokingly) called hat-stealer for the last two days of Double Wars.

wpid-20140704_204456.jpgSo I took a head measurement by means of a string, lost the string before leaving the event, and took delivery of half a meter of red wool from the gentleman to make a sewn flat cap for delivery at Double Wars. wpid-20140704_204639.jpgWith the measurement I drew out a circle, made two discs an appropriate depth which I stitched together along the outside edge and turned inside out to topstitch along the outside. Then I cut out a crown another appropriate size larger than the disc which I stitched in to the inside edge of the brim, making laid pleats all around the circumference. Then I folded in the other side of the brim to enclose all raw edges. I will advise the recipient to add a “sweatband” of either silk or velvet on the inside as well. Pretty much all extant flat caps, even for poorer folk, have a lining of silk (finds from the Mary Rose for example) so I will also recommend that to the recipient. It took me just under seven hours to make this all by hand, so I think I will definitely make myself a flat cap in the same manner as well.

wpid-20140704_204538.jpg wpid-20140704_204725.jpg

The fourth and final project is the one for myself, which I am also doing by hand. I discovered after Double Wars that I only had two chemises for my 15th Century wardrobe, and as I’m planning on wearing that for Cudgel War I wanted to make at least one more. Some of the linen in my stash went with me and I cut out a very simple A-line kirtle bodice, fairly straight sleeves with underarm gussets of a strange shape. No godets. I discovered I didn’t need them for fullness once I had made up the side seams. All seams are sewn up, and felled with linen thread, and the only thing left to do is carefully hem the neckline. I’m planning on doing that on Tuesday, when I’m going over to Master SvartulvR and Viscountess Elizabeth to hang out and craft.